Sign Up for Free

RunKit +

Try any Node.js package right in your browser

This is a playground to test code. It runs a full Node.js environment and already has all of npm’s 400,000 packages pre-installed, including infinispan with all npm packages installed. Try it out:

var infinispan = require("infinispan")

This service is provided by RunKit and is not affiliated with npm, Inc or the package authors.

infinispan v0.4.0

Infinispan Javascript client

Infinispan JS Client

infinispan is an asynchronous event-driven Infinispan client for Node.js. The results of the asynchronous operations are represented using Promise instances. Amongst many advantages, promises make it easy to transform/chain multiple asynchronous invocations and they improve error handling by making it easy to centralise it.

The client is under heavy development but here's a summary of its current capabilities:

  • infinispan client can be constructed with a single server address or multiple servers addresses. When passing multiple addresses, it will iterate until it finds a server to which it can connect to.
  • Clients can interact with a named cache whose name is passed on client construction via {cacheName: 'myCache'} option. In the absence of any cache name options, the client will interact with the default cache.
  • Full CRUD operation support, e.g. put, get, remove, containsKey...etc.
  • Compare-And-Swap operation support, e.g. putIfAbsent, getWithMetadata, replace, replaceWithVersion, removeWithVersion..etc.
  • Expiration with absolute lifespan or relative maximum idle time is supported. This expiration parameters as passed as optional parameters to create/update methods and they support multiple time units, e.g. {lifespan: '1m', maxIdle: '1d'}.
  • Update and remove operations can optionally return previous values by passing in {previous: true} option.
  • Bulk store/retrieve/delete operations are supported, e.g. putAll, getAll, clear...etc.
  • Cache contents can be iterated over using the iterator method.
  • Cache size can be determined using the size method.
  • Remote cache listeners can be plugged using the addListener method, which takes the event type (create, modify, remove or expiry) and the function callback as parameter.
  • Clients can store scripts using addScript and then they can be remotely executed using the execute operation. Executing a script remotely optionally takes per-invocation parameters.
  • Server-side statistics can be retrieved using the stats operation.
  • Clients can talk to clusters of Infinispan Server instances, using Consistent-Hash based algorithms to route key-based operations.
  • Multi-key or key-less operations are routed in round-robin fashion.
  • Clients only need to be configure with a single node's address and from that node the rest of the cluster topology can be discovered. As nodes are added or destroyed, clients get notified of changes in the cluster topology dynamically.
  • Finally, clients can stop communication with the server(s) using the disconnect method.

Requirements

infinispan client requires Node.js version 0.10 or higher.

It can only talk to Infinispan Server 8.x or higher versions.

By default, Infinispan clients talk Hot Rod protocol version 2.5 which is supported starting with Infinispan 8.2.x.

To talk to Infinispan Server versions 8.0.x or 8.1.x, infinispan should be instructed to use Hot Rod protocol version 2.2. To do so, infinispan must be constructed with {version: '2.2'} optional argument.

Usage

Before executing these code samples, Infinispan Server must be downloaded from here and installed locally bearing in the support version information provided above. Unless indicated otherwise, the code samples below require an Infinispan Server instance to be started. The simplest way to do so is to execute the following script:

$ [INFINISPAN_SERVER_HOME]/bin/standalone.sh

Please find below samples codes showing how the Infinispan Javascript client can be used:

Working with single entries and statistics

var infinispan = require('infinispan');

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'});

connected.then(function (client) {

  var clientPut = client.put('key', 'value');

  var clientGet = clientPut.then(
      function() { return client.get('key'); });

  var showGet = clientGet.then(
      function(value) { console.log('get(key)=' + value); });

  var clientRemove = showGet.then(
      function() { return client.remove('key'); });

  var showRemove = clientRemove.then(
      function(success) { console.log('remove(key)=' + success); });

  var clientStats = showRemove.then(
    function() { return client.stats(); });

  var showStats = clientStats.then(
    function(stats) {
      console.log('Number of stores: ' + stats.stores);
      console.log('Number of cache hits: ' + stats.hits);
      console.log('All stats: ' + JSON.stringify(stats, null, " "));
    });

  return showStats.finally(
      function() { return client.disconnect(); });

}).catch(function(error) {

  console.log("Got error: " + error.message);

});

Using conditional operations

var infinispan = require('infinispan');

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'});

connected.then(function (client) {

  var clientPut = client.putIfAbsent('cond', 'v0');

  var showPut = clientPut.then(
      function(success) { console.log(':putIfAbsent(cond)=' + success); });

  var clientReplace = showPut.then(
      function() { return client.replace('cond', 'v1'); } );

  var showReplace = clientReplace.then(
      function(success) { console.log('replace(cond)=' + success); });

  var clientGetMetaForReplace = showReplace.then(
      function() { return client.getWithMetadata('cond'); });

  var clientReplaceWithVersion = clientGetMetaForReplace.then(
      function(entry) {
        console.log('getWithMetadata(cond)=' + JSON.stringify(entry));
        return client.replaceWithVersion('cond', 'v2', entry.version);
      }
  );

  var showReplaceWithVersion = clientReplaceWithVersion.then(
      function(success) { console.log('replaceWithVersion(cond)=' + success); });

  var clientGetMetaForRemove = showReplaceWithVersion.then(
      function() { return client.getWithMetadata('cond'); });

  var clientRemoveWithVersion = clientGetMetaForRemove.then(
      function(entry) {
        console.log('getWithMetadata(cond)=' + JSON.stringify(entry));
        return client.removeWithVersion('cond', entry.version);
      }
  );

  var showRemoveWithVersion = clientRemoveWithVersion.then(
      function(success) { console.log('removeWithVersion(cond)=' + success)});

  return showRemoveWithVersion.finally(
      function() { return client.disconnect(); });

}).catch(function(error) {

  console.log("Got error: " + error.message);

});

Working with multiple entries

var infinispan = require('infinispan');

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'});

connected.then(function (client) {
  var data = [
    {key: 'multi1', value: 'v1'},
    {key: 'multi2', value: 'v2'},
    {key: 'multi3', value: 'v3'}];

  var clientPutAll = client.putAll(data);

  var clientGetAll = clientPutAll.then(
    function() { return client.getAll(['multi2', 'multi3']); });

  var showGetAll = clientGetAll.then(
    function(entries) {
      console.log('getAll(multi2, multi3)=%s', JSON.stringify(entries));
    }
  );

  var clientIterator = showGetAll.then(
    function() { return client.iterator(1); });

  var showIterated = clientIterator.then(
    function(it) {
      function loop(promise, fn) {
        // Simple recursive loop over iterator's next() call
        return promise.then(fn).then(function (entry) {
          return !entry.done ? loop(it.next(), fn) : entry.value;
        });
      }

      return loop(it.next(), function (entry) {
        console.log('iterator.next()=' + JSON.stringify(entry));
        return entry;
      });
    }
  );

  var clientClear = showIterated.then(
    function() { return client.clear(); });

  return clientClear.finally(
    function() { return client.disconnect(); });

}).catch(function(error) {

  console.log("Got error: " + error.message);

});

Working with ephemeral data

var infinispan = require('infinispan');
var Promise = require('promise');

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'});

connected.then(function (client) {

  var clientPutExpiry = client.put('expiry', 'value', {lifespan: '1s'});

  var clientGetMetaAndSize = clientPutExpiry.then(
    function() {
      // Compute getWithMetadata and size in parallel
      return Promise.all([client.getWithMetadata('expiry'), client.size()]);
    });

  var showGetMetaAndSize = clientGetMetaAndSize.then(
    function(values) {
      console.log('before expiration:');
      console.log('getWithMetadata(expiry)=' + JSON.stringify(values[0]));
      console.log('size=' + values[1]);
    });

  var clientContainsAndSize = showGetMetaAndSize.then(
    function() {
      sleepFor(1100); // Sleep to force expiration
      return Promise.all([client.containsKey('expiry'), client.size()]);
    });

  var showContainsAndSize = clientContainsAndSize.then(
    function(values) {
      console.log('after expiration:');
      console.log('containsKey(expiry)=' + values[0]);
      console.log('size=' + values[1]);
    });

  return showContainsAndSize.finally(
    function() { return client.disconnect(); });

}).catch(function(error) {

  console.log("Got error: " + error.message);

});

function sleepFor(sleepDuration){
  var now = new Date().getTime();
  while(new Date().getTime() < now + sleepDuration){ /* do nothing */ }
}

Interact with named caches

var infinispan = require('infinispan');

var connected = infinispan.client(
  {port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'}, {cacheName: 'namedCache'});

connected.then(function (client) {

  console.log('Connected to `namedCache`');

  return client.disconnect();

}).catch(function(error) {

  console.log("Got error: " + error.message);

});

Connect failover

The client can be configured with multiple server addresses and it will loop through them until it finds a node to which it can be connected, as shown in this example:

var infinispan = require('infinispan');

// Accepts multiple addresses and fails over if connection not possible
var connected = infinispan.client(
  [{port: 99999, host: '127.0.0.1'}, {port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'}]);

connected.then(function (client) {

  var members = client.getTopologyInfo().getMembers();

  console.log('Connected to: ' + JSON.stringify(members));

  return client.disconnect();

}).catch(function(error) {

  console.log("Got error: " + error.message);

});

Remote events

var infinispan = require('infinispan');
var Promise = require('promise');

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'});

connected.then(function (client) {

  var clientAddListenerCreate = client.addListener(
    'create', function(key) { console.log('[Event] Created key: ' + key); });

  var clientAddListeners = clientAddListenerCreate.then(
    function(listenerId) {
      // Multiple callbacks can be associated with a single client-side listener.
      // This is achieved by registering listeners with the same listener id
      // as shown in the example below.
      var clientAddListenerModify = client.addListener(
        'modify', function(key) { console.log('[Event] Modified key: ' + key); },
        {listenerId: listenerId});

      var clientAddListenerRemove = client.addListener(
        'remove', function(key) { console.log('[Event] Removed key: ' + key); },
        {listenerId: listenerId});

      return Promise.all([clientAddListenerModify, clientAddListenerRemove]);
    });

  var clientCreate = clientAddListeners.then(
    function() { return client.putIfAbsent('eventful', 'v0'); });

  var clientModify = clientCreate.then(
    function() { return client.replace('eventful', 'v1'); });

  var clientRemove = clientModify.then(
    function() { return client.remove('eventful'); });

  var clientRemoveListener =
        Promise.all([clientAddListenerCreate, clientRemove]).then(
          function(values) {
            var listenerId = values[0];
            return client.removeListener(listenerId);
          });

  return clientRemoveListener.finally(
    function() { return client.disconnect(); });

}).catch(function(error) {

  console.log("Got error: " + error.message);

});

Script Execution

The client has the ability to remotely execute scripts on the server. To do so, it must first load the script in the server and then invoke it. So, given the following script called sample-script.js:

// mode=local,language=javascript,parameters=[k, v],datatype='text/plain; charset=utf-8'
cache.put(k, v);
cache.get(k);

The Infinispan Javascript client could load and execute it using the following code:

var infinispan = require('infinispan');
var Promise = require('promise');
var readFile = Promise.denodeify(require('fs').readFile);

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'});

connected.then(function (client) {

  var addScriptFile = readFile('sample-script.js').then(
    function(file) {
      return client.addScript('sample-script', file.toString());
    });

  var clientExecute = addScriptFile.then(
    function() {
      return client.execute('sample-script', {k: 'exec-key', v: 'exec-value'});
    });

  var showExecute = clientExecute.then(
    function(ret) { console.log('Script execution returned: ' + ret); });

  return showExecute.finally(
    function() { return client.disconnect(); });

}).catch(function(error) {

  console.log("Got error: " + error.message);

});

Encryption

The client supports encryption via SSL/TLS with optional TLS/SNI support (Server Name Indication). To set this up, it is necessary to create a Java KeyStore (JKS) using the keytool application which is part of the JDK. The keystore needs to contains the keys and certificates necessary for the Infinispan Server to authorize connections. More information on how to configure the Infinispan Server for encryption, along with TLS/SNI, can be found here.

In the most basic set up, the Javascript client can be configured with the location of the trusted certificates so that the client connection is authorized by the server. This assumes that the server has been configured with the correct certificates as stated above. With that in mind, the client can be configured in the following way:

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'},
  {
    ssl: {
      enabled: true,
      trustCerts: ['my-root-ca.crt.pem']
    }
  }
);

Alternatively, the client can also read trusted certificates from PKCS#12 or PFX format key stores:

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'},
  {
    ssl: {
      enabled: true,
      cryptoStore: {
        path: 'my-truststore.p12',
        passphrase: 'secret'
      }
    }
  }
);

The client can also be configured with encrypted authentication. To do that, it's necessary to provide the location of the private key, the passphrase and certificate key of the client:

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'},
  {
    ssl: {
      enabled: true,
      trustCerts: ['my-root-ca.crt.pem'],
      clientAuth: {
        key: 'privkey.pem',
        passphrase: 'secret',
        cert: 'cert.pem'
      }
    }
  }
);

Optionally, the client can indicate which hostname it is attempting to connect to at the start of the TLS/SNI handshaking process:

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11222, host: '127.0.0.1'},
  {
    ssl: {
      enabled: true,
      trustCerts: ['my-root-ca.crt.pem']
      sniHostName: 'example.com'
    }
  }
);

If no sniHostName is provided, the underlying Node.js TLS/SNI implementation sends localhost as SNI parameter. This is important to note because if the server's default realm does not match localhost, you'll encounter errors such as Hostname/IP doesn't match certificate's altnames.

Another gotcha with the Node.js TLS/SSL implementation is that by default it does not allow self-signed certificates. If using self-signed certificates, you'll encounter errors such as DEPTH_ZERO_SELF_SIGNED_CERT or SSL certificate problem: Invalid certificate chain. To avoid problems like this in testing scenarios, one possible solution is to create your own certificate authority, which is used to sign all keys. An example on how to do this can be found in the make-root-ca-and-certificates.sh script found in the root of this repository. This script contains all the commands necessary to create your own CA, sign certificates, create private keys, and even create Java KeyStore files for the server. A more detailed example of the contents of this script can be found in this repository. Another possibility is to get certificates from free, open certificate authorities such as Let's Encrypt.

Working with Clusters

All previous examples are focused on how the API behaves when working with a single Infinispan Server instance. Additionally, multiple Infinispan Servers can be clustered in order to provide failover for the data and scale up. Working with a Infinispan Server cluster is very similar to working with a single instance but there's a few things to bear in mind:

  • No matter the size of the Infinispan Server cluster, the client only needs to know about a server's address in order to get information about the entire cluster topology.
  • For distributed caches, key-based operations are routed in the cluster using the same consistent hash algorithms used by the server, so that means that the client can locate where a particular key resides without the need of extra network hops.
  • For distributed caches, multi-key or key-less operations are routed in round robin fashion.
  • For replicated/invalidated caches, all operations are routed in round robin fashion, regardless of whether they are key-based or multi-key/key-less.

The routing and failover is transparent to the user code, so the operations executed against in a cluster look exactly the same as in the previous code examples.

You can run a test locally by starting multiple instances of Infinispan Server like this:

$ ./bin/standalone.sh -c clustered.xml -Djboss.node.name=node0 -Djboss.socket.binding.port-offset=100
$ ./bin/standalone.sh -c clustered.xml -Djboss.node.name=node1 -Djboss.socket.binding.port-offset=200
$ ./bin/standalone.sh -c clustered.xml -Djboss.node.name=node2 -Djboss.socket.binding.port-offset=300

And then using this code to verify that the topology is the expected one:

var infinispan = require('infinispan');

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11322, host: '127.0.0.1'});

connected.then(function (client) {

  var members = client.getTopologyInfo().getMembers();

  // Should show all expected cluster members
  console.log('Connected to: ' + JSON.stringify(members));

  // Add your own operations here...

  return client.disconnect();

}).catch(function(error) {

  console.log("Got error: " + error.message);

});

Working with Sites

Multiple Infinispan Server clusters can be deployed in such way that each cluster belongs to a different site. Such deployments are done to enable data to be backed up from one cluster to another, potentially in a different geographical location. This Javascript client implementation not only can failover between failures in nodes within a cluster, but if the entire cluster fails to respond, it can failover to a different cluster. If the failover succeeds, the client will remain connected to the alternative cluster until this becomes unavailable, in which case it’ll try any other clusters defined, and ultimately, it’ll try the original server settings. To be able to failover between clusters, first and foremost Infinispan Servers have to be configured with cross-site replication. Next, the client has to provide alternative clusters configuration with at least one host/port pair details for each of the clusters configured. For example:

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11322, host: '127.0.0.1'},
  {
    clusters: [
      {
        name: 'site-a',
        servers: [{port: 1234, host: 'hostA1'}]
      },
      {
        name: 'site-b',
        servers: [{port: 2345, host: 'hostB1'}, {port: 3456, host: 'hostB2'}]
      }
    ]
  });

Manual Cluster Switch

As well as supporting automatic site cluster failover, Javascript clients can also switch between site clusters manually by calling switchToCluster(clusterName) and switchToDefaultCluster(). Using switchToCluster(clusterName)``, users can force a client to switch to one of the clusters pre-defined in the client configuration. To switch to the initial servers defined in the client configuration, callswitchToDefaultCluster()`. For example:

var connected = infinispan.client({port: 11322, host: '127.0.0.1'},
  {
    clusters: [
      {
        name: 'site-a',
        servers: [{port: 1234, host: 'hostA1'}]
      },
      {
        name: 'site-b',
        servers: [{port: 2345, host: 'hostB1'}, {port: 3456, host: 'hostB2'}]
      }
    ]
  });

connected.then(function (client) {

  var switchToB = client.getTopologyInfo().switchToCluster('site-b');

  switchToB.then(function(switchSucceed) {

    if (switchSucceed) {
      ...
    }

    ...

    var switchToDefault = client.getTopologyInfo().switchToDefaultCluster();

    switchToDefault.then(function(switchSucceed) {

      if (switchSucceed) {
        ...
      }

    })

  })

});

Testing

Before executing any tests, Infinispan Server instances need to be started up so that testsuite can run against those. To ease this process, a script has been created in the root directory to start all the expected server instances. Before executing this script, the following installation steps are required:

  • Install an Infinispan Server instance in /opt/infinispan-server folder.

Once these steps have been executed, the script to start the servers can be executed via:

$ ./run-domain.sh

To run tests continuously execute the following:

$ ./node_modules/.bin/jasmine-node spec --autotest --watch lib --captureExceptions

To run individual tests, execute the following:

$ node node_modules/jasmine-node/lib/jasmine-node/cli.js spec/infinispan_local_spec.js --captureExceptions

Debugging

To debug tests with IDE:

node --debug-brk node_modules/jasmine-node/lib/jasmine-node/cli.js spec/codec_spec.js

Or:

node --debug-brk node_modules/jasmine-node/lib/jasmine-node/cli.js spec/infinispan_local_spec.js

And then start a remote Node.js debugger from IDE on port 5858.

Tests, servers and ports

Here's some more detailed information on which tests interact with which servers and on which ports. On top of that, you can find information on which tests are always running as opposed to those that are started (and stopped) by the tests themselves.

| Test | Server Profile | Ports (Auto/Manual) | | ------------- |:---------------:| -------------------------------- :| | local spec | local | 11222 (A) | | expiry spec | local | 11222 (A) | | cluster spec | clustered | 11322 (A), 11332 (A), 11342 (A) | | failover spec | clustered | 11422 (A), 11432 (M), 11442 (M) | | ssl spec | local | 11232 (A), 12242 (A), 12252 (A) | | xsite spec | earth, moon | 11522 (earth, M), 11522 (moon, M) |

Generating API documentation

The client contains JSDoc formatted API docs which can be generated via:

npm install jsdoc
./node_modules/.bin/jsdoc lib/*.js
open out/index.html

Metadata

RunKit is a free, in-browser JavaScript dev environment for prototyping Node.js code, with every npm package installed. Sign up to share your code.
Sign Up for Free