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stripe v7.14.0

Stripe API wrapper

Stripe Node.js Library

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The Stripe Node library provides convenient access to the Stripe API from applications written in server-side JavaScript.

Please keep in mind that this package is for use with server-side Node that uses Stripe secret keys. To maintain PCI compliance, tokenization of credit card information should always be done with Stripe.js on the client side. This package should not be used for that purpose.

Documentation

See the stripe-node API docs for Node.js.

Installation

Install the package with:

npm install stripe --save

Usage

The package needs to be configured with your account's secret key which is available in your Stripe Dashboard. Require it with the key's value:

const stripe = require('stripe')('sk_test_...');

const customer = await stripe.customers.create({
  email: 'customer@example.com',
});

Or using ES modules, this looks more like:

import Stripe from 'stripe';
const stripe = Stripe('sk_test_...');
//…

On older versions of Node, you can use promises or callbacks instead of async/await.

Initialize with config object

The package can be initialized with several options:

import ProxyAgent from 'https-proxy-agent';

const stripe = Stripe('sk_test_...', {
  apiVersion: '2019-08-08',
  maxNetworkRetries: 1,
  httpAgent: new ProxyAgent(process.env.http_proxy),
  timeout: 1000,
  host: 'api.example.com',
  port: 123,
  telemetry: true,
});
OptionDefaultDescription
apiVersionnullStripe API version to be used. If not set the account's default version will be used.
maxNetworkRetries0The amount of times a request should be retried.
httpAgentnullProxy agent to be used by the library.
timeout120000 (Node default timeout)Maximum time each request can take in ms.
host'api.stripe.com'Host that requests are made to.
port443Port that requests are made to.
telemetrytrueAllow Stripe to send latency telemetry

Note: Both maxNetworkRetries and timeout can be overridden on a per-request basis. timeout can be updated at any time with stripe.setTimeout.

Usage with TypeScript

Stripe does not currently maintain typings for this package, but there are community typings available from DefinitelyTyped.

To install:

npm install --dev @types/stripe

To use:

// Note `* as` and `new Stripe` for TypeScript:
import * as Stripe from 'stripe';
const stripe = new Stripe('sk_test_...');

const customer: Promise<
  Stripe.customers.ICustomer
> = stripe.customers.create(/* ... */);

Using Promises

Every method returns a chainable promise which can be used instead of a regular callback:

// Create a new customer and then a new charge for that customer:
stripe.customers
  .create({
    email: 'foo-customer@example.com',
  })
  .then((customer) => {
    return stripe.customers.createSource(customer.id, {
      source: 'tok_visa',
    });
  })
  .then((source) => {
    return stripe.charges.create({
      amount: 1600,
      currency: 'usd',
      customer: source.customer,
    });
  })
  .then((charge) => {
    // New charge created on a new customer
  })
  .catch((err) => {
    // Deal with an error
  });

Using callbacks

On versions of Node.js prior to v7.9:

var stripe = require('stripe')('sk_test_...');

stripe.customers.create(
  {
    email: 'customer@example.com',
  },
  function(err, customer) {
    if (err) {
      // Deal with an error (will be `null` if no error occurred).
    }

    // Do something with created customer object
    console.log(customer.id);
  }
);

Configuring Timeout

Request timeout is configurable (the default is Node's default of 120 seconds):

stripe.setTimeout(20000); // in ms (this is 20 seconds)

Timeout can also be set globally via the config object:

const stripe = Stripe('sk_test_...', {
  timeout: 2000,
});

And on a per-request basis:

stripe.customers.create(
  {
    email: 'customer@example.com',
  },
  {
    timeout: 1000,
  }
);

If timeout is set globally via the config object, the value set in a per-request basis will be favored.

Configuring For Connect

A per-request Stripe-Account header for use with Stripe Connect can be added to any method:

// Retrieve the balance for a connected account:
stripe.balance
  .retrieve({
    stripeAccount: 'acct_foo',
  })
  .then((balance) => {
    // The balance object for the connected account
  })
  .catch((err) => {
    // Error
  });

Configuring a Proxy

An https-proxy-agent can be configured with setHttpAgent.

To use stripe behind a proxy you can pass to sdk on initialization:

if (process.env.http_proxy) {
  const ProxyAgent = require('https-proxy-agent');

  const stripe = Stripe('sk_test_...', {
    httpProxy: new ProxyAgent(process.env.http_proxy),
  });
}

Network retries

Automatic network retries can be enabled with the maxNetworkRetries config option. This will retry requests n times with exponential backoff if they fail due to an intermittent network problem. Idempotency keys are added where appropriate to prevent duplication.

const stripe = Stripe('sk_test_...', {
  maxNetworkRetries: 2, // Retry a request twice before giving up
});

Network retries can also be set on a per-request basis:

stripe.customers.create(
  {
    email: 'customer@example.com',
  },
  {
    maxNetworkRetries: 2, // Retry this specific request twice before giving up
  }
);

Examining Responses

Some information about the response which generated a resource is available with the lastResponse property:

charge.lastResponse.requestId; // see: https://stripe.com/docs/api/request_ids?lang=node
charge.lastResponse.statusCode;

request and response events

The Stripe object emits request and response events. You can use them like this:

const stripe = require('stripe')('sk_test_...');

const onRequest = (request) => {
  // Do something.
};

// Add the event handler function:
stripe.on('request', onRequest);

// Remove the event handler function:
stripe.off('request', onRequest);

request object

{
  api_version: 'latest',
  account: 'acct_TEST',              // Only present if provided
  idempotency_key: 'abc123',         // Only present if provided
  method: 'POST',
  path: '/v1/charges',
  request_start_time: 1565125303932  // Unix timestamp in milliseconds
}

response object

{
  api_version: 'latest',
  account: 'acct_TEST',              // Only present if provided
  idempotency_key: 'abc123',         // Only present if provided
  method: 'POST',
  path: '/v1/charges',
  status: 402,
  request_id: 'req_Ghc9r26ts73DRf',
  elapsed: 445                       // Elapsed time in milliseconds
  request_start_time: 1565125303932  // Unix timestamp in milliseconds
  request_end_time: 1565125304377    // Unix timestamp in milliseconds
}

Webhook signing

Stripe can optionally sign the webhook events it sends to your endpoint, allowing you to validate that they were not sent by a third-party. You can read more about it here.

Please note that you must pass the raw request body, exactly as received from Stripe, to the constructEvent() function; this will not work with a parsed (i.e., JSON) request body.

You can find an example of how to use this with Express in the examples/webhook-signing folder, but here's what it looks like:

const event = stripe.webhooks.constructEvent(
  webhookRawBody,
  webhookStripeSignatureHeader,
  webhookSecret
);

Testing Webhook signing

You can use stripe.webhooks.generateTestHeaderString to mock webhook events that come from Stripe:

const payload = {
  id: 'evt_test_webhook',
  object: 'event',
};

const payloadString = JSON.stringify(payload, null, 2);
const secret = 'whsec_test_secret';

const header = stripe.webhooks.generateTestHeaderString({
  payload: payloadString,
  secret,
});

const event = stripe.webhooks.constructEvent(payloadString, header, secret);

// Do something with mocked signed event
expect(event.id).to.equal(payload.id);

Writing a Plugin

If you're writing a plugin that uses the library, we'd appreciate it if you identified using stripe.setAppInfo():

stripe.setAppInfo({
  name: 'MyAwesomePlugin',
  version: '1.2.34', // Optional
  url: 'https://myawesomeplugin.info', // Optional
});

This information is passed along when the library makes calls to the Stripe API.

Auto-pagination

As of stripe-node 6.11.0, you may auto-paginate list methods. We provide a few different APIs for this to aid with a variety of node versions and styles.

Async iterators (for-await-of)

If you are in a Node environment that has support for async iteration, such as Node 10+ or babel, the following will auto-paginate:

for await (const customer of stripe.customers.list()) {
  doSomething(customer);
  if (shouldStop()) {
    break;
  }
}

autoPagingEach

If you are in a Node environment that has support for await, such as Node 7.9 and greater, you may pass an async function to .autoPagingEach:

await stripe.customers.list().autoPagingEach(async (customer) => {
  await doSomething(customer);
  if (shouldBreak()) {
    return false;
  }
});
console.log('Done iterating.');

Equivalently, without await, you may return a Promise, which can resolve to false to break:

stripe.customers
  .list()
  .autoPagingEach((customer) => {
    return doSomething(customer).then(() => {
      if (shouldBreak()) {
        return false;
      }
    });
  })
  .then(() => {
    console.log('Done iterating.');
  })
  .catch(handleError);

If you prefer callbacks to promises, you may also use a next callback and a second onDone callback:

stripe.customers.list().autoPagingEach(
  function onItem(customer, next) {
    doSomething(customer, function(err, result) {
      if (shouldStop(result)) {
        next(false); // Passing `false` breaks out of the loop.
      } else {
        next();
      }
    });
  },
  function onDone(err) {
    if (err) {
      console.error(err);
    } else {
      console.log('Done iterating.');
    }
  }
);

If your onItem function does not accept a next callback parameter or return a Promise, the return value is used to decide whether to continue (false breaks, anything else continues).

autoPagingToArray

This is a convenience for cases where you expect the number of items to be relatively small; accordingly, you must pass a limit option to prevent runaway list growth from consuming too much memory.

Returns a promise of an array of all items across pages for a list request.

const allNewCustomers = await stripe.customers
  .list({created: {gt: lastMonth}})
  .autoPagingToArray({limit: 10000});

Request latency telemetry

By default, the library sends request latency telemetry to Stripe. These numbers help Stripe improve the overall latency of its API for all users.

You can disable this behavior if you prefer:

stripe.setTelemetryEnabled(false);

More Information

Development

Run all tests:

$ yarn install
$ yarn test

If you do not have yarn installed, you can get it with npm install --global yarn.

Run a single test suite without a coverage report:

$ yarn mocha-only test/Error.spec.js

Run a single test (case sensitive) in watch mode:

$ yarn mocha-only test/Error.spec.js --grep 'Populates with type' --watch

If you wish, you may run tests using your Stripe Test API key by setting the environment variable STRIPE_TEST_API_KEY before running the tests:

$ export STRIPE_TEST_API_KEY='sk_test....'
$ yarn test

Run prettier:

Add an editor integration or:

$ yarn fix
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